KMOX 1120AM

Flooding at Carlyle Lake Nears Old Record

Kevin Killeen
View Comments
Carlyle Lake flooding (Photo/Bill Reker KMOX)

Carlyle Lake flooding (Photo/Bill Reker KMOX)

CARLYLE LAKE –(KMOX)–The folks who live and work around Carlyle Lake, Illinois are wondering, how much higher can it go?

The popular boating and fishing lake is 13 feet higher than normal and projected to crest Wednesday just two-feet shy of the old record set back in 2002.   Usually, the high water would have been released into the Mississippi .

But with severe flooding down the Mississippi,  the U-S Army Corps of Engineers,  has not allowed any water to be released to ease pressure.

U-S Army Corps of Engineers Assistant Project Manager at Carlyle Lake, Jackie Taylor, says no homes are threatened, but there is already controlled flooding around the lake.   

“We do not allow homes at the elevation where they would flood on flowage easement,” Taylor said, “There are some garages, barns and things like that inundated at this point.   And there are several township and county roads that are inundated.”

flood sheds1 Flooding at Carlyle Lake Nears Old Record

Carlyle Lake flood (Photo/Bill Reker KMOX)

Taylor says crews are monitoring the dams and levees around the lake and they don’t see any problems at this point.   Taylor declined to speculate on what might happen if heavy rain up north along the Kaskaskia river pushes Carlyle Lake past its old record.

Meanwhile, the National Weather Service in St. Louis  is worried about the long range chance of rain on the upper Mississippi causing problems between St. Louis and Hannibal.

“As wet as things are, not only in the St. Louis area, but also to our north, any amount of rainfall makes us nervous,” Fuchs said. 

Right now, the Mississippi has crested from Hannibal to St. Louis and is slowly receding, but not fast enough, when Fuchs looks at the forecast.

The next six-to-ten days calls for above average rainfall in the upper Mississippi valley, as does the next three months.

“If you get a high rainfall event on the upper end of the Mississippi , it wouldn’t take a whole lot more to get it back up to rather high levels and rather dangerous levels,” Fuchs said.

Copyright KMOX

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,823 other followers