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City Not Looking To Ban Party Tents After Saturday’s Death

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A "day after" look at the tent that blew apart Saturday south of Busch Stadium, killing a man and injuring several dozen. (KMOX/Brad Choat)

A “day after” look at the tent that blew apart Saturday south of Busch Stadium, killing a man and injuring several dozen. (KMOX/Brad Choat)

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ST. LOUIS (KMOX/AP) – The public safety director in the city of St. Louis says there’s a lesson to be learned from Saturday’s fatal tent collapse outside a bar near Busch Stadium.

“It’s incumbent on property owners of bars and restaurants to have somebody whose job it is to keep an eye on that (severe weather) and to have a contingency plan for people to move in an orderly way, as weather approaches,” Eddie Roth told KMOX News on Sunday.

Roth says high winds are to blame for the tent outside Kilroy’s being lifted up and smashed down.

Around 100 people were injured. One person died.

City Building Commissioner Frank Oswald says the bar was granted a tent permit on April 11 and it passed inspection a couple of days later. But he says the city requires tents to withstand up to 90 mph winds and authorities estimate that Saturday’s gusts were about 50 mph.

As for an update on the injured, Eddie Roth had this to say, Sunday, “The numbers are fluid. I think some have been released. There are still some hospitalized. There have been some walk-ins. After an event like this, similar to a bus crash, people get home, their adrenaline settles down, and they realize they’re not feeling quite right.”

© Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright  2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

 

 

 

 

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