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Mississippi River to Crest Above Flood Stage, Locks to Close

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UPI/Bill Greenblatt

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

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ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOX) — As homeowners on both sides of the Mississippi continue to clean up following Thursday’s devastating flash floods, the Mississippi itself and other large rivers throughout our region are now the focus of concern.

National Weather Service senior forecaster Scott Truett said it rained so much so fast that meteorologists immediately switched over to concerns about flooding.

“Almost every main steam river in our area is forecasted to go above flood stage and some of it is significant flooding,” said Truett. He listed rivers like, “the Missouri, the Meramec, the Mississippi, the Illinois.”

A color-coded map on the National Weather Service website shows a sizable amount of flooding north of the metro-area in Hannibal and Quincy.

St. Louis Flooding

Officials predict the Mississippi River to crest at 39.4 feet on the St. Louis riverfront next Tuesday. That’s a little more than nine feet over flood stage. The record crest set back in 1993 was more than 49 feet.

Still the high crest will force the shutdown of the St. Louis harbor to all navigation.

The rising waters are prompting the city of St. Louis to start closing flood gates. The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District has already locked down four gates along the Mississippi River between East Grand and Madison.

Friday morning, the streets department will close four more gates in the shadow of the Gateway Arch, at Poplar Street and Carr along Lenore K Sullivan Blvd.

Crews will continue shutting down gates throughout the weekend as the river rises towards it’s forecasted crest.

1993

This might bring back haunting memories of 1993, but National Weather Service forecaster Scott Truett told KMOX there are some differences that may prevent area rivers from hitting those record levels.

“93 was a little bit different because there was such an extent of snowpack well north in the upper region of the Missouri basin,” said Truett. “We didn’t quite have that same situation this year, but nonetheless it’s very wet in early spring and that’s always a concern.”

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