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Study Finds Testosterone Spike After Defeat of Rivals

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Dr. Mark Flinn

Dr. Mark Flinn

CBS St. Louis (con't)

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COLUMBIA, MO (KMOX) - A new University of Missouri study on testosterone shows there is a big difference in how a man’s body reacts following competition.

Lead researcher Dr. Mark Flinn at the University of Missouri-Columbia says when men compete against friends, whether they win or lose, their testosterone levels don’t change very much.

“On the other hand, when you’re competing against the guys from the community next door that are not your friends – in context they can be your enemies – then we see big changes,” he explained. “When you’re victorious then your testosterone levels go up and when you’re defeated your testosterone levels go down.”

Flinn says this hormonal reaction may be related to the formation of alliances in warfare.

This testosterone rise doesn’t just happen in male athletes but also in the male sports fans who watch games as well.

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