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BBB Offers Tips To Avoid Typhoon Charity Scams

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Survivors of Super Typhoon Haiyan queue up to board a US military C-130 plane for Manila after the plane arrived carrying relief supplies at Tacloban airport in the central Philippines on November 11, 2013, after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the city on November 8.  US military planes on November 11 joined a frantic effort to rescue famished survivors of the monster typhoon that may have killed 10,000 people in the Philippines, as local security forces struggled to contain looting.      AFP PHOTO / TED ALJIBE        (Photo credit should read TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

Survivors of Super Typhoon Haiyan queue up to board a US military C-130 plane for Manila after the plane arrived carrying relief supplies at Tacloban airport in the central Philippines on November 11, 2013, after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the city on November 8. US military planes on November 11 joined a frantic effort to rescue famished survivors of the monster typhoon that may have killed 10,000 people in the Philippines, as local security forces struggled to contain looting. AFP PHOTO / TED ALJIBE (Photo credit should read TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOX) – Many may be thinking of reaching out and donating money to the victims of the Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. The St. Louis Better Business Bureau encourages that, but warns givers to donate responsibly.

Chris Thetford with the St. Louis BBB offers these tips:

1. Do your homework. Thetford says find out if the charity is providing direct aid or raising money for other groups. You may want to avoid the middleman and give directly to charities that have a presence in the region. “You’re donating to a group that can actually get on the ground.”

2. Safety first. Thetford says most of the time you will be donating electronically. That means the organization will be asking for your credit card or debt card number. “If you’re not careful with who you share that information with you could end up having problems.”

3. Ignore unsolicited emails. A creditable organization will not send you an unsolicited emails asking for donations.

4. Be care of social media. Thetford says third-party recommendations such as bloggers may not have fully researched the listed relief organizations.

5. Ask the BBB. The BBB will always steer you to a safe organization.

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