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FBI Cracking Down on Laser-Pointing Attacks on Aircrafts

Brett Blume (@brettblumekmox)
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Edward W. Reinhold, Acting Special Agent in Charge of the FBI St. Louis division, announces people found aiming a laser pointer at an airplane will be arrested and the informant will be awarded $10 thousand, as part of a nation-wide awareness program, in Des Peres, Missouri on June 3, 2014. The FBI in the St. Louis area has partnered with the Wehrenberg Theatres to show a trailer in over 200 locations regarding the problem. The pointing of a laser at a airplane can temporarily blind the pilot. Photo: UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Edward W. Reinhold, Acting Special Agent in Charge of the FBI St. Louis division, announces people found aiming a laser pointer at an airplane will be arrested and the informant will be awarded $10 thousand, as part of a nation-wide awareness program, in Des Peres, Missouri on June 3, 2014. The FBI in the St. Louis area has partnered with the Wehrenberg Theatres to show a trailer in over 200 locations regarding the problem. The pointing of a laser at a airplane can temporarily blind the pilot. Photo: UPI/Bill Greenblatt

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Brett Blume has been employed as a News Reporter at KMOX since...
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ST. LOUIS (KMOX) - The FBI today launched an aggressive new 90-day campaign against those who point lasers at aircrafts, temporarily blinding pilots and endangering everyone on board.

Anyone who wants to know what it’s like to be targeted in a “lasing” can ask airline pilot Captain Robert Hamilton.

“What goes through your mind is, ‘Am I going to be able to complete this flight safely? How am I going to land when I can’t see?'” he says.

Through Labor Day, the FBI is joining with the FAA to offer rewards of up to $10,000 for information that leads to an arrest in a laser-pointing attack.

Ed Reinhold, acting Special-Agent-in-Charge for the St. Louis FBI office, says a similar effort earlier this year produced good results.

“We saw a 19 percent decrease in the number of events,” he says.

Lasing an aircraft, even if it’s meant as a joke, can lead to five years in prison and thousands of dollars in fines upon conviction.

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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