Follow Your Nose -- Which Landfills Are Irritating North CountiansThe nose knows which landfills have been irritating north county neighbors, says Ed Smith at the Missouri Coalition for the Environment.
EPA: Nuclear Waste Closer to Bridgeton Landfill FireThe EPA released new data showing the underground fire at the Bridgeton landfill is much closer than originally thought to the nuclear waste from the Manhattan Project.
State Attorney General Chides EPA Over West Lake LandfillMissouri Attorney General Chris Koster is criticizing the Environmental Protection Agency for missing deadlines in its planned cleanup of the West Lake Landfill near St. Louis.
EPA to Build Isolation Barrier for West Lake LandfillThe EPA has decided to build an isolation barrier at the West Lake landfill.
High Number Of Rare Cancer Cases Found In Missouri CommunityOfficials are concerned after an unusual amount of cancer cases have popped up in a community outside of St. Louis, Missouri.
St. Louis County Releases Disaster Plan for West Lake LandfillIf radiation were detected, some nearby residents would be urged to evacuate, and others would be urged to take shelter in their homes.
West Lake Landfill Encloses a Unique DangerA national radioactive waste watchdog says West Lake Landfill's underground garbage fire is the only landfill with that problem.
Fresh Call for Total Removal of Nuclear Waste in BridgetonA longtime leader of the environmental movement in St. Louis is calling for the total removal of all nuclear waste from the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton.
Residents Want More Testing at West Lake LandfillOwner Republic Services says it feels latest round sought by state is unnecessary.
New Concerns About the Bridgeton Landfill FireThe state Department of Natural Resources is sending a letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, asking for more information on where the fire is in relation to buried nuclear waste.
Bridgeton Landfill Sparking New WorriesNew worries today about the burning Bridgeton landfill, including where the fire is, and how much time it might take to build a firebreak trench to isolate the nuclear waste.
EPA Puts Six-Month Delay on Firebreak Trench ProjectIt was supposed to start this summer, but now the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it will be six months or more before it begins digging a firebreak trench to separate the burning Bridgeton landfill from nearby nuclear waste.

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