Skunk

The brown marmorated stink bug, an invasive insect species from Asia, is seen in a trap on the Catoctin Mountain Orchard June 17, 2011, in Thurmont, Maryland. The stink bug has become a serious pest in fruit-growing regions damaging cherries, peaches and plums by inserting their sucking mouth parts into tender fruit, causing ugly scarring called "cat facing". Each female will lay enough eggs to make another 400 stink bugs. A stink bug from Asia is chomping up US vegetable fields, orchards and vineyards, causing experts to scramble through an arsenal of weapons to try and halt this stealthy, smelly predator.  Pesticides, parasites and traps have all been tried but none have succeeded in killing off the brown marmorated stink bug, which first surfaced in the northeastern United States in 1996 and has since spread to 33 states. (PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Here Come the Stink Bugs

Missouri has become the latest state to be hit by the brown marmorated stink bug, which when threatened, lets off an odor that many describe as skunk-like.

05/13/2015

Skunk

Officials Urge Caution Around Missouri Skunks

Missouri health officials say skunks are one of the two primary carriers of the rabies virus in Missouri.

02/11/2013

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