Brett Blume (@brettblumekmox)

ST. PETERS, Mo. (KMOX) – Hundreds of residents who live near the proposed site for a go-kart race track in St. Peters are now breathing a lot easier.

The city’s Board of Aldermen rejected the proposed 370 Speedway on 36 acres of land in the Lakeside 370 special district by a 6-1 vote, Thursday night.

June 26, 2016-Developer Paul Irwin (left) listens as citizen after citizen spoke out against his proposal to build a 370 Speedway in St. Peters. The plan went down to defeat on a 6-1 vote. (KMOX/Brett Blume)

June 26, 2016-Developer Paul Irwin (left) listens as citizen after citizen spoke out against his proposal to build a 370 Speedway in St. Peters. The plan went down to defeat on a 6-1 vote. (KMOX/Brett Blume)

“I’m so happy with our Board of Aldermen and the mayor that they listened to us,” said rack track opponent Cindy Wynn, wiping tears from her eyes moments after the vote was taken. “I love this city. I’m very impressed by how responsive they are to us.”

Developer Paul Irwin of St. Charles, had tried earlier in the meeting to assure peace and quiet for those living near the 36-acre proposed site. The citizens were worried both about noise from the high-revving go-cart engines and a glare from the lights that would glow late into the evening.

“370 Speedway would install acoustic fencing and noise buffers around the area to further reduce sound levels at the facility,” Irwin says. “A lot of thought and research has gone into the choice of this location. 370 Speedway has spent over ten years searching for a location that would be convenient for patrons and not negatively impact the surrounding areas.”

But it was far from enough to convince those living in the Turnberry Bluffs neighborhood and other nearby developments that they would not be “negatively impacted” by the racing at 370 Speedway.

They brought in their own sound expert, to counter one hired by Irwin. The two strongly disagreed on the estimation of how much noise would evade from the track.

“The clumping of race carts will give you this variation (of noise) as they run around, so you’ll hear an ‘up and down’, which is extremely annoying,” says sound expert Jim Holtrop.

Just prior to the vote, speedway opponent Cindy Wynn made an impassioned plea to the Board of Aldermen.

“You’ve heard the fact now that this sound will reach us,” Wynn says. “It will impact our property values, it will impact our quality of life.”

After the resounding defeat, developer Irwin was far from devastated.

He shrugged, said he gave it his best shot, and then suggested that nearby communities like Bridgeton or Maryland Heights might be next in line to hear about his idea.

(TM and ? Copyright 2016 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2016 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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